Back to top

exhibitions

Showing in our red gallery and in our newly developed upper gallery space we are displaying a stunning new range of works from our gallery artists - including works by Anna Bussot, Andrew Sinclair, Alan Hayman, Brian Henderson, Jim Wright and Jonathan Shearer.

Helen Michie | Shoreline

Right from the outset during and after her time at Gray’s School of Art, Helen Michie was determined to include a range of materials or disciplines in her art making. For her, painting, ceramics, mosaic or sculpture were all equally valid and to be embraced. This need for creative freedom has left Helen open to many opportunities throughout her varied career.

Here in the Shoreline exhibition Helen brings together Raku wall pieces, stoneware bowls, porcelain forms and mixed media paintings made in response to Scotland’s west coast and in particular our local area in which she has lived and worked for over 20 years.

In bringing these disciplines together Helen considers:

 ‘The co-existence of fragility, transience and ephemeral beauty alongside the strength and permanence found in nature, light and the elements … 

The use of the Raku firing method captures this concept by its very nature. The process is influenced by the weather on the day of firing and the smoked decorative markings are caught or lost in an instant.

The stoneware pieces aim to echo the essence of the coastal rocks contrasting with the fluidity and movement of the ebbing sea and the paintings are my response to the textures, colours and atmosphere of the shoreline environment.

The exhibition has given me an inspiring framework to enable each material, clay and paint, to be used simultaneously and a natural process of cross over between the qualities of the materials has taken place.”

In her desire to ‘capture a moment in time’ Helen can be seen to be reflecting the values, aesthetic form, and philosophy of many Contemporary Japanese Ceramicists. Whether it is in the Zen like process of Raku, the interactions of the glazes in the stoneware, movement caught in the porcelain or the creative textural transformation that occurs between the paint, mediums, and gels in the paintings, we are offered an opportunity to be transported into the transcendence of the Shoreline.

Joyce Gunn Cairns

Edinburgh based artist Joyce Gunn Cairns MBE trained in Drawing and Painting at Edinburgh College of Art, having previously completed a degree in German and Comparative Religion at Aberdeen University.

Gunn Cairns’ figurative work includes wildlife studies and portraits. She has painted some of Scotland’s most eminent cultural figures but often her subjects are imaginary, and are more about self-searching than life-like depiction. Whatever the focus of her works, her main values are authenticity and honesty.

Using sharp, hard pencils and oil paint on board, her process is one of application and scraping back. She says “I work on several pieces at once … my eye is darting from one piece to another, recognising when something isn’t ‘speaking’ to me. Sometimes  … I go from one painting to another, scraping back and retouching, searching for meaning.’

Gunn-Cairns paintings speak to the human condition. With a subtle, muted palette and a sensitive, searching aesthetic, these apparently gentle works are at the same time direct and probing, revealing very much more than their surface appearance. Similarly, with her paintings and drawings of animals, Joyce Gunn-Cairns gets beneath the surface to reveal something of the innate character of her subjects.

In terms of influences, Gunn-Cairns cites Käthe Kolwitz, Rembrandt, Dürer, Joan Eardley, and Gwen John. All artists in whose work, she says, she detects “no trace of affectation or insincerity”. A rightful and fitting context for her!

 

Gillian Murray

Gillian Murray was born in Perth and studied Fine Art (Printmaking) at Aberdeen’s Gray’s School of Art. She worked for many years running the Screenprinting department at Edinburgh Printmakers before recently deciding to focus full time on her own practice. She lives and works in Edinburgh.

With a focus on landscape Murray seeks out quiet, remote locations, off the beaten path where she “can feel an affinity with the landscape”.  It is here that she makes sketches in which the ‘line’ is of prime importance.

 “The ‘line’ . . . is the link between me physically being in a place drawing, to it appearing in my final screenprint. It is the constant in my work around which I then create planes of colour and textures to make the final print.”

“It is easy to be immersed in the process of printmaking.  Making layers, trying to get the colours just right and mixing subtle blends all add to the anticipation in revealing the final image from the press.  It is this combination of method and intuitiveness that keeps me fascinated by the printmaking medium.”

It is without doubt that Murray’s skill and sensitivity have come together in equal measure in these enticing and intriguing representations of the landscape.

A lovely exhibition from our gallery artists, including work from Andrew Sinclair, Brian Henderson, David Dipnall, Helen Fryer, Helen Michie, Katherine Maclean, Ruth O'Dell, David Greenall and Alan Hayman.

Current Exhibition

the spring show

30 March to 11 May
andrew sinclair
30 March to 11 May
brian henderson
30 March to 11 May
brian henderson

helen michie | shoreline

30 March to 11 May
30 March to 11 May
30 March to 11 May

Joyce Gunn Cairns and Gillian Murray

30 March to 11 May
joyce gunn cairns
30 March to 11 May
gillian murray
30 March to 11 May
joyce gunn cairns
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
Pinterest