lotte glob

watching the flow at dusk
£2,500.00
low tide
£2,500.00
calm water
£2,500.00
book of the sea
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loch eriboll creatures - mother and child
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the ceramicist lotte glob on her sculpture croft in north west scotland
lotte glob

Lotte Glob is a Danish ceramicist, born in 1944, who has lived and worked on the North West coast of Scotland for 50 years. Having played with clay from a young age, at 14, she left school and became an apprentice to the Danish ceramist Gutte Eriksen, before moving on to work at a traditional slipware pottery, where she was taught by Knud Jensen in Denmark. In 1963, aged 19, she began to travel extensively, and has worked in Ireland, Scotland and France. Her worldwide explorations include the landscapes of Iceland, the Faroe Islands, Greenland, New Zealand, Spain, Sweden and the cityscapes of New York, Barcelona, Stockholm and Helsinki. 

In 1968, Glob established a workshop in Balnakeil Craft Village at Durness in Sutherland, and later moved to Loch Eriboll, nine miles east of Durness. Here she built a timber house designed by architect Gökay Deveci that later won the RIAS Award for Architecture. Since moving to this location, she has worked hard to develop the 14 acres of rough land, planting 4000 trees, creating what she refers to as a ‘sculpture croft’. Far from manicured, it is a maze of uneven pathways, winding between trees, bushes and boggy land. More than fifty of the artist’s sculptures are dotted throughout this landscape, waiting for a quiet observer to stumble upon them.

Lotte Glob’s work explores the powerful relationship between human beings and nature, fusing rocks and sediments with clay. Surrounded by the UNSECO North West Highlands Geopark, Glob often hikes in the mountains, gathering materials and inspiration for her sculptures and returning her work to nature by placing sculptures at various locations in the landscape. 

Lotte Glob’s work can be found in many private and public collections, including the Museum of Fine Art, Copenhagen; National Museum of Scotland Edinburgh; The McManus Museum and Art Gallery, Dundee; Mclaurin Gallery, Ayr; the Victoria and Albert Museum Library Collection; Paisley Museum and Art Galleries and the Stirling University collection.

the ceramicist lotte glob on her sculpture croft in north west scotland
lotte glob

Lotte Glob is a Danish ceramicist, born in 1944, who has lived and worked on the North West coast of Scotland for 50 years. Having played with clay from a young age, at 14, she left school and became an apprentice to the Danish ceramist Gutte Eriksen, before moving on to work at a traditional slipware pottery, where she was taught by Knud Jensen in Denmark. In 1963, aged 19, she began to travel extensively, and has worked in Ireland, Scotland and France. Her worldwide explorations include the landscapes of Iceland, the Faroe Islands, Greenland, New Zealand, Spain, Sweden and the cityscapes of New York, Barcelona, Stockholm and Helsinki. 

In 1968, Glob established a workshop in Balnakeil Craft Village at Durness in Sutherland, and later moved to Loch Eriboll, nine miles east of Durness. Here she built a timber house designed by architect Gökay Deveci that later won the RIAS Award for Architecture. Since moving to this location, she has worked hard to develop the 14 acres of rough land, planting 4000 trees, creating what she refers to as a ‘sculpture croft’. Far from manicured, it is a maze of uneven pathways, winding between trees, bushes and boggy land. More than fifty of the artist’s sculptures are dotted throughout this landscape, waiting for a quiet observer to stumble upon them.

Lotte Glob’s work explores the powerful relationship between human beings and nature, fusing rocks and sediments with clay. Surrounded by the UNSECO North West Highlands Geopark, Glob often hikes in the mountains, gathering materials and inspiration for her sculptures and returning her work to nature by placing sculptures at various locations in the landscape. 

Lotte Glob’s work can be found in many private and public collections, including the Museum of Fine Art, Copenhagen; National Museum of Scotland Edinburgh; The McManus Museum and Art Gallery, Dundee; Mclaurin Gallery, Ayr; the Victoria and Albert Museum Library Collection; Paisley Museum and Art Galleries and the Stirling University collection.